Creative Commons, U.S. Department of Education, and Open Society Foundations present

Why Open Education Matters

Create a short video that explains the benefits and promise of Open Educational Resources for teachers, students and schools everywhere.

Winners Announced!

View Winners here

Creative Commons, the U.S. Department of Education, and the Open Society Foundations are pleased to announce the winners of the Why Open Education Matters video competition. The competition was launched in March 2012 to solicit creative videos that clearly communicate the use and potential of free, high-quality Open Educational Resources — or “OER” — and describe the benefits and opportunities these materials create for teachers, students, and schools everywhere. U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan announced the competition with a video on the Why Open Education Matters website. The competition received over 60 qualified entries. The winning ...

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Vote now for your favorite video

We're happy to see so many great submissions to the video competition. You can now view all the qualifying videos and vote for your favorite. The goal of the competition is to raise awareness of Open Educational Resources (OER) and solicit short, creative videos that help explain what Open Educational Resources are and how they can be beneficial for teachers, students, and schools everywhere around the world. The competition closed on June 5. Public Choice Award voting will end July 11, 2012. We hope to announce all the winners on July 18, 2012. Good luck!

Our panel of judges ...

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The Public Choice Award voting will begin soon

UPDATE June 18, 2012

We wanted to launch the voting for the Public Choice Award today, but we'll need a few more days to get it up and running. We apologize for the delay, and we'll announce here when we're ready to begin. Thanks again everyone for submitting your great videos, and for your patience with this process.

Thanks to everyone for submitting your videos!

Congratulations on getting in your submission to the Why Open Education Matters video competition. It looks like there's a bunch of great videos and we can't wait to take a look at them all. We'll have more information soon on next steps, particularly the public choice voting where you'll be able to vote for your favorite video explaining OER. Thanks again everyone. If you have any questions or had a problem submitting your video, please send us a note at tvol [at] creativecommons [dot] org.

One week left to submit your videos!

There's one week left to submit your videos to the Why Open Education Matters competition. We're super excited to see all the creative videos you've created. Just as a reminder, be sure that you've read and understand the Official Rules.

A few other quick reminders:

* Non-U.S. citizens may enter the competition.
* You have to be 13 years to enter.
* Your video should be no more than 3 minutes long.
* Videos are due by midnight on June 5, 2012.
* You can work in teams.
* Your video has to be licensed under CC BY.
* You can host ...

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What are Creative Commons licenses?

Open licenses are a central component to Open Educational Resources. Creative Commons licenses are the global standard for open content licenses. CC provides the legal framework for OER. With CC licenses, learners can find and incorporate free materials for reports and presentations; educators can customize textbooks and lesson plans; universities can distribute video lectures to a global audience; and publishers can adapt materials and develop services for an enhanced learning experience.

Here's a nice video done by the Creative Commons team in New Zealand that explains the licenses.

Just as a reminder, all your submissions to the Why Open ...

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How will the videos be judged?

After the contest deadline, we're going to sort through all the eligible entries and recommend the five best to be rated by our great panel of judges. The judges include Davis Guggenheim, Nina Paley, Liz Dwyer, Anya Kamenetz, James Franco, Angela Lin, and Mark Surman. Those judges will award the first and second place prizes based on the following 100-point scale:

25 points: overall impact (persuasive, informational, educational)
25 points: originality and creativity (concepts, ideas, format)
25 points: relevance and clarity of message
25 points: technical proficiency and quality

In addition to the first ($25,000) and second ($5 ...

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One month to go to enter the competition!

In March, Creative Commons, the U.S. Department of Education, and the Open Society Institute launched the Why Open Education Matters Video Competition. The goal of the competition is to raise awareness of Open Educational Resources (OER) and solicit short, creative videos that help explain what Open Educational Resources are and how they can be beneficial for teachers, students, and schools everywhere around the world.

There's been lots of interest in the competition, and we wanted to remind you that the deadline to submit your video is June 5, 2012. The contest is open to all, and submissions can ...

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Who's eligible to enter the competition?

There have been some questions about whether persons who are not U.S. citizens can enter the video competition. The answer is YES! Of course, it's great that the U.S. Department of Education is helping host the video competition, and that Secretary Duncan has voiced his support for Why Open Education Matters.

We encourage participation far and wide. You must be at least 13 years old to enter, but you don't have to live in the United States or be a U.S. citizen. Nonprofits, schools, and companies may also enter a video. Teams can work together ...

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What themes should my video contain?

There's a lot of different ways that you can approach the charge of "Create a short video that explains the benefits and promise of Open Educational Resources for teachers, students and schools everywhere."

We want you to be as creative as you can in writing, recording, and editing your video submissions. Your video should be sure to communicate to a wide audience a clear, concise, and exciting vision for open education. Keep it simple, but think big.

Regarding potential content or themes you might tackle, listed below are a few of the possible directions you might take. Please use ...

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