Creative Commons, U.S. Department of Education, and Open Society Foundations present

Why Open Education Matters

Create a short video that explains the benefits and promise of Open Educational Resources for teachers, students and schools everywhere.

Judges

A panel of the judges below will choose the first ($25,000) and second ($5,000) place prizes. A community vote will choose the Public Choice Award (see below).

Davis Guggenheim

David Guggenheim

Davis Guggenheim is an Academy Award-winning American film director and producer. His credits as a producer and director include Training Day, The Shield, Alias, 24, NYPD Blue, ER, Deadwood, and Party of Five and the documentaries An Inconvenient Truth and Waiting for 'Superman'. Since 2006, Guggenheim is the only filmmaker to release three different documentaries that were ranked within the top 100 highest-grossing documentaries of all time (An Inconvenient Truth, It Might Get Loud, and Waiting for 'Superman'). Davis is on the Board of Directors of Creative Commons.

This bio is adapted from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Davis_Guggenheim and is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 license (CC BY-SA). This photo is licensed under the Creative Common Attribution 2.0 license (CC BY). Attribution Flickr user joi.

Nina Paley

Nina Paley

Nina Paley is the creator of the animated musical feature film Sita Sings the Blues, which has screened in over 150 film festivals and won over 35 international awards including the Annecy Grand Crystal, The IFFLA Grand Jury Prize, and a Gotham Award. Her adventures in our broken copyright system led her to copyLeft her film, and join QuestionCopyright.org as Artist-in-Residence. Prior to becoming an animator Nina was a syndicated cartoonist; she is now re-releasing all her old comics under a Creative Commons Share-Alike license. A 2006 Guggenheim Fellow, Nina is currently producing a series of animated shorts about intellectual freedom called Minute Memes.

This photo is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 license (CC BY-SA). Attribution Gordon Fitch.

Liz Dwyer

Liz Dwyer

Liz Dwyer is the education editor at GOOD magazine. She has written on race, parenting and education for several national media outlets, and was named one of Parenting Magazine's top bloggers of 2010. Dwyer previously worked as the education ambassador for the $20 million dollar Pepsi Refresh Project and as a social media consultant for several companies. She has over fifteen years of experience in education, including teaching grade school in both Guangzhou, China and Compton, California, and worked on Teach For America’s Los Angeles staff, where she supervised first and second-year K-12 teachers in the Compton, Lynwood and Los Angeles Unified school districts. She serves on the board of singer John Legend’s “Show Me Ed Reform” campaign, actress Karyn Parson's Sweet Blackberry foundation, and runs marathons in her spare time.

Photo used by permission.

Anya Kamenetz

Anya Kamenetz

Anya Kamenetz is a staff writer for Fast Company magazine and a columnist for Tribune Media. Kamenetz has written books including Generation Debt (2006) and DIY U: Edupunks, Edupreneurs, and the Coming Transformation of Higher Education (2010). Her writing has also appeared in New York Magazine, The New York Times, The Washington Post, Salon, The Nation, the The Forward newspaper, and Vegetarian Times.

This bio is adapted from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anya_Kamenetz and is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 license (CC BY-SA). This photo is licensed under the Creative Common Attribution 2.0 license (CC BY). Attribution Flickr user fcb.

James Franco

James Franco

James Franco is an actor, artist, and filmmaker. Franco has done both dramatic and comedic work in projects and has appeared in an eclectic range of films since the 2000s, ranging from period to contemporary pieces, and from major Hollywood productions to less publicized indie films, as well as fantasy films to biopics and soap operas. His performance in 127 Hours earned him a nomination for an Academy Award, Golden Globe and Screen Actors Guild Award. Franco currently teaches a class at New York University about transferring poetry to film.

This bio is adapted from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/James_franco and is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 license (CC BY-SA). This photo is licensed under the Creative Common Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 license (CC BY-SA). Attribution Flickr user vanessalua.

Angela Lin

Angela Lin

Angela Lin oversees all things education at YouTube, including content strategy, partnerships and original programming. Her work reaches across the learning spectrum from K12 to higher ed to lifelong learning, featuring educational content that ranges from purely academic to wildly inspirational. Prior to joining YouTube, Angela was a strategy consultant specializing in digital media and entertainment and served as a film programmer at the Los Angeles Film Festival. Angela began her career as a Page at NBC where she worked on SNL, the Today Show, and the Olympics. She has also worked on productions for the Travel Channel in Peru, TVB in Hong Kong, and the Shanghai Grand Theatre in China. Angela graduated with honors in economics from Harvard College and holds an MBA from Harvard Business School.

Photo used by permission.

Mark Surman

Mark Surman

Mark Surman is the Executive Director of the Mozilla Foundation, with a focus on inventing new ways to promote an open, participatory Internet. Prior to work at Mozilla, he was an open philanthropy fellow at the Shuttleworth Foundation in South Africa, where he invented new ways to apply open source thinking to social innovation. Mark’s been a community technology activist for almost 20 years, and was the founding director of telecentre.org, a $26 million effort to network community technology activists in countries around the world.

This bio is adapted from http://www.mozilla.org/en-US/press/bios/#bio-su and is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 license (CC BY-SA). This photo is licensed under the Creative Common Attribution 2.0 license (CC BY). Attribution Flickr user joi.

Judging Criteria

Eligible entries will be scored based on the following guidelines.

Public Choice Award

The public will vote for their favorite video to determine the winner of the Public Choice Award. This voting will take place on whyopenedmatters.org beginning in June 2012 and will last for 30 days [Update: we plan on opening the Public Choice Award voting on June 18, 2012 and closing on July 11, 2012]. Once the public voting period opens, each individual wishing to submit a vote for the Public Choice Award must sign up for an account with their real name and valid email address via whyopenedmatters.org or log in via one of the OpenAuth services provided on the site.

Each individual is entitled to submit only one vote. No one can pay or otherwise compensate others to vote for a particular video, nor can anyone engage in or encourage automated voting.

The video receiving the most votes will receive the Public Choice Award. In the event of a tie, the Public Choice Award will be split equally among the tying videos. If the video receiving the most public votes is selected as a winner for the first or second prize by the expert judging panel, the Public Choice Award will be given to the video receiving the next highest amount of public votes. In no event will a video be awarded more than one prize.